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Classroom Management Tips for Working with Secondary Students:

Managing a secondary classroom effectively requires a blend of strategies tailored to meet the developmental and educational needs of adolescents. Classroom management is not just about maintaining order but also about creating a positive learning environment that encourages student engagement and fosters mutual respect.

Here are some effective classroom management strategies specifically designed for secondary students:

1. Establish Clear Expectations
  • Set clear, achievable rules and expectations at the beginning of the year, and involve students in the process. This helps students feel a sense of ownership and understanding of what is expected of them.
  • Consistently enforce rules to maintain a fair and predictable environment.
2. Build Relationships
  • Get to know your students as individuals. Show interest in their lives outside the classroom, which can significantly impact their engagement and behavior positively.
  • Use positive reinforcement to acknowledge good behavior and achievements, which can motivate students and build a positive classroom atmosphere.
3. Engage Students in the Learning Process
  • Incorporate a variety of teaching methods to cater to different learning styles, including group work, projects, discussions, and technology integration.
  • Make lessons relevant to students' lives, which increases their interest and engagement.
4. Foster Independence
  • Encourage self-regulation and responsibility by giving students choices where appropriate, such as in project topics or seating arrangements. This promotes autonomy and personal responsibility.
  • Teach organizational and study skills as part of your curriculum, helping students manage their time and responsibilities effectively.
5. Manage Classroom Dynamics
  • Be aware of group dynamics and address any issues that may arise, such as bullying or cliques, promptly and effectively.
  • Promote a sense of community in the classroom where students feel valued and respected. Activities that encourage collaboration and understanding among students can help achieve this.
6. Utilize Technology
  • Incorporate educational technology to engage students and enhance learning. Tools like interactive whiteboards, learning management systems, and educational apps can make learning more interactive and enjoyable.
  • Set boundaries and guidelines for technology use in the classroom to prevent distractions.
7. Differentiate Instruction
  • Adapt lessons to meet the diverse learning needs and levels of your students. This might include providing different materials, altering assignments, or using flexible grouping strategies.
  • Provide regular feedback to guide student learning and development. Personalized comments on assignments and assessments can help students understand their progress and areas needing improvement.
8. Handle Disruptions Effectively
  • Address disruptions calmly and consistently, using a predetermined system of consequences. Keeping the focus on learning and not on the disruption helps maintain a positive classroom environment.
  • Use de-escalation strategies when conflicts arise, and model conflict resolution skills.
9. Plan Engaging Lessons
  • Start with an engaging "hook" to grab students' attention at the beginning of each lesson.
  • Keep lessons dynamic by incorporating movement, activities, and breaks to help students stay focused.
10. Professional Development
  • Seek out professional development opportunities to stay informed about new teaching methods, classroom management strategies, and subject matter updates. Sharing strategies and experiences with colleagues can also provide new insights and support.

Effective classroom management in secondary education requires a balance of structure, empathy, and innovative teaching methods. By implementing these strategies, teachers can create a positive and productive learning environment that encourages student success and minimizes behavioral issues.

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Welcome [FIRST NAME GOES HERE], are you looking for ways to engage your students in investigating Phenomenon aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards? Well, check out this free handout with step-by-step instructions. Click for Science Phenomenon Graphic Organizer.

Other NGSS Science Resources

NGSS 6-8 SCIENCE MEGA BUNDLE

EARTH SCIENCE MEGA BUNDLE

PHYSICAL SCIENCE MEGA BUNDLE

LIFE SCIENCE MEGA BUNDLE

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 Check out my introduction to master lesson planning! Watch My Introduction Video

Are you overwhelmed by planning? Is your time limited? Do you need simple step-by-step processes for meeting the expectations of your students? I completely understand, I have felt the same way that you do and have spent years putting together simple step-by-step processes for planning. I have used the processes in my Master Lesson Planning Course to help teachers for over 18 years and I WANT TO HELP YOU TOO! Over the years I have created so many step-by-step processes that I have used when working with teachers to plan lessons that are engaging, aligned to standards, meet the needs of diverse learners, and ensure assessments are used to provide data.

I was overwhelmed with the expectations to differentiate, keep all students engaged, ensure standards were taught and assessed, and know all the different teacher jargon. It was a bit consuming of my time.As I worked on these skills, I realized I had a knack for making complicated processes simple. I begin to not only have success with my own planning, but I found myself helping other teachers to plan as well.

I know that these steps, tips, and reference pages will help make your job a bit less overwhelming. These processes led to great gains in student achievement and I ended up becoming a curriculum specialist that worked with teachers across the state. Then I became a school administrator where our school has shown gains by using many of these processes I have shared with my teachers.

Let’s be honest, teachers are the hardest workers out there. These processes will just help you work smarter.

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 THE LESSON CYCLE:




ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TEACHER PLANNING
FREE PLANNING GUIDES AND PLANNING RESOURCES
MASTER LESSON PLANNING COURSE FOR NEW TEACHERS



The lesson cycle is a framework used by teachers to design, deliver and evaluate lessons. It is a process that helps to ensure that the lesson is effective and meets the learning objectives. The lesson cycle consists of four stages: planning, teaching, assessing, and reflecting. In this blog post, we will discuss each stage of the lesson cycle in detail.



Stage 1: Planning

  • Planning is the first stage of the lesson cycle. It involves deciding on the learning objectives, designing the activities, and choosing the resources needed for the lesson. During this stage, the teacher should consider the learners’ needs and interests to create a lesson that is relevant and engaging. The teacher should also consider the level of the learners and adjust the lesson accordingly.
  • The planning stage should also include setting clear and measurable learning objectives. Learning objectives provide direction for the lesson and help the teacher to assess whether the learners have achieved the desired outcomes. The teacher should ensure that the learning objectives are achievable within the time frame of the lesson.
There are many planning procedures that teachers can use to effectively plan their lessons and activities. Here are a few examples:
  • Backward design: This approach involves starting with the desired outcomes or learning objectives and working backwards to develop activities and assessments that will help students achieve those objectives. This method ensures that the lessons and activities are focused on the desired outcomes.
  • Curriculum mapping: This involves creating a map or chart of the curriculum, including the topics to be covered, the order in which they will be covered, and the resources needed. This method helps teachers to see the big picture of what needs to be taught and when.
  • Lesson planning: This involves creating a detailed plan for each individual lesson, including the objectives, activities, materials, and assessments. This method ensures that the teacher has a clear plan for each lesson and can keep track of progress.
  • Differentiated instruction: This involves planning for different levels and types of learners within the same classroom, so that each student can be challenged and supported in their learning. This method involves planning for different activities, materials, and assessments that will meet the needs of all learners.
  • Collaborative planning: This involves working with other teachers or professionals to plan lessons and activities together. This method allows for different perspectives and ideas, and can lead to more effective and engaging lessons.
Examples:
  • Review your curriculum and credential expectations to ensure you are teaching the appropriate content and then spice it up with engaging activities to learn that content
  • Plan for a variety of activity over the allotted time with students
  • Make sure you include a bell ringer, background lessons, engaging demonstrations/labs, partner/group work, assessment of daily learning, center activities, and possible projects
  • Change activities frequently to avoid boredom and passive learning
FREE PLANNING GUIDES AND PLANNING RESOURCES



Stage 2: Teaching

  • The teaching stage is where the teacher delivers the lesson to the learners. During this stage, the teacher should ensure that the learners are actively engaged in the lesson. The teacher should use a variety of teaching strategies, such as lectures, discussions, and group work, to ensure that all learners are catered for. The teacher should also monitor the progress of the learners to ensure that they are meeting the learning objectives.
  • During the teaching stage, the teacher should also provide feedback to the learners. Feedback can be in the form of praise or constructive criticism. Feedback helps the learners to improve their understanding of the subject and to identify areas that need improvement.

There are many teaching strategies that teachers can use to engage their students and facilitate learning. Here are a few examples:


  • Lecture: This is a traditional method of teaching where the teacher delivers information to the students through verbal communication. Lectures can be enhanced with visual aids, handouts, and other materials to help students better understand the information being presented.
  • Discussion: This involves facilitating a conversation between students about a specific topic. This strategy encourages students to share their ideas, ask questions, and listen to others. Discussions can be conducted in small groups or as a whole class.
  • Cooperative learning: This involves dividing students into small groups to work together on a project or activity. This strategy promotes teamwork, communication, and problem-solving skills.
  • Inquiry-based learning: This involves posing questions and problems to students and encouraging them to explore and discover the answers on their own. This strategy promotes critical thinking, problem-solving, and curiosity.
  • Project-based learning: This involves assigning a project to students that requires them to apply what they have learned in a creative and meaningful way. This strategy promotes collaboration, creativity, and real-world application of knowledge.
  • Technology-based learning: This involves using technology tools such as computers, tablets, and multimedia resources to enhance student learning. This strategy can help students develop technology skills and engage with the material in new and exciting ways.
  • Differentiated instruction: This involves tailoring teaching methods and materials to meet the individual needs of each student. This strategy recognizes that students have different learning styles, abilities, and interests, and seeks to provide personalized instruction to each student.

Examples:


  • Monitor student learning throughout the entire lesson by walking around the room
  • Ask prompting questions, make sure you are following your plan that includes a variety of activities.

FREE PLANNING GUIDES AND PLANNING RESOURCES



Stage 3: Assessing

  • Assessing is the stage where the teacher evaluates the learners’ progress towards achieving the learning objectives. The assessment can be formal or informal. Formal assessments include tests and exams, while informal assessments include observations and discussions.
  • Assessment provides feedback to the teacher and the learners. It helps the teacher to identify areas where the learners need further support and to adjust the lesson accordingly. It also provides the learners with feedback on their progress and helps them to identify areas where they need to improve.

Assessing students formally and informally is an important part of teaching that helps teachers evaluate student learning and adjust their instruction accordingly. Here are some examples of formal and informal assessments:

Formal Assessments:


  • Standardized tests: These are tests that are designed to measure student knowledge and skills in a standardized manner. Examples include state or national standardized tests, college entrance exams, and AP exams.
  • Summative assessments: These are assessments that are given at the end of a unit, semester, or year to measure student achievement. Examples include final exams, unit tests, and end-of-year projects.
  • Performance assessments: These are assessments that require students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in a real-world context. Examples include science experiments, research papers, and oral presentations.
  • Portfolios: These are collections of student work that demonstrate their progress over time. Portfolios can include written work, art projects, and other assignments.

Informal Assessments:


  • Formative assessments: These are assessments that are used throughout the learning process to monitor student progress and adjust instruction. Examples include quizzes, exit tickets, and class discussions.
  • Observations: These are informal assessments where teachers observe student behavior and participation in class. Observations can be used to identify areas where students are struggling and provide targeted support.
  • Questioning: This is a technique where teachers ask students questions to assess their understanding of the material. Teachers can use questioning to clarify misunderstandings and prompt deeper thinking.
  • Self-assessment: This is a process where students reflect on their own learning and progress. Self-assessment can help students take ownership of their learning and identify areas where they need to improve.

Both formal and informal assessments have their own advantages and disadvantages. Formal assessments are often more reliable and objective, but can be stressful for students and may not provide a complete picture of student learning. Informal assessments are more flexible and can be used to adjust instruction in real-time, but may not be as reliable as formal assessments. Teachers should use a combination of both formal and informal assessments to gain a comprehensive understanding of student learning and adjust their instruction accordingly.

Examples:


  • Test/exams at the end of the unit
  • Ticket out at the end of a lesson or activity within a lesson
  • Have a student do a demonstration to show mastery of lesson
  • Questioning and providing wait time
  • Allowing student to self discover and assess their knowledge/foundation of content

FREE PLANNING GUIDES AND PLANNING RESOURCES



Stage 4: Reflecting

  • Reflecting is the final stage of the lesson cycle. It involves the teacher reflecting on the lesson and evaluating its effectiveness. The teacher should consider whether the learning objectives were met, whether the learners were engaged and whether the teaching strategies were effective.
  • Reflection provides an opportunity for the teacher to identify areas for improvement and to make adjustments for future lessons. It also provides an opportunity for the teacher to celebrate successes and to identify what worked well.
  • Reflecting on teaching and student progress is an important process that allows teachers to evaluate their teaching methods and the effectiveness of their instruction. Here are some steps that teachers can take to reflect on their teaching and student progress:
  • Collect data: Collect data on student progress, such as test scores, homework assignments, and class participation. This data can provide a snapshot of how well students are understanding the material and can help identify areas where students are struggling.
  • Analyze the data: Analyze the data collected to identify patterns, strengths, and weaknesses in student performance. This analysis can help teachers identify areas where they need to modify their instruction or provide additional support.
  • Reflect on teaching methods: Reflect on teaching methods and strategies that were effective in helping students achieve their learning goals. Teachers can consider what worked well and what did not work well and make adjustments as needed.
  • Seek feedback: Seek feedback from students, parents, and colleagues to gain different perspectives on teaching and student progress. This feedback can provide insights into areas where teachers may need to improve their instruction or provide additional support.
  • Set goals: Set goals for improving teaching methods and supporting student progress. Teachers can set short-term and long-term goals to help guide their teaching practices and ensure that they are making progress towards improving student achievement.
  • Implement changes: Implement changes to teaching methods and strategies based on the data, feedback, and goals. Teachers can try new approaches and evaluate their effectiveness to determine if they are making progress towards improving student achievement.

By regularly reflecting on teaching and student progress, teachers can continually improve their teaching practices and support student success.

Examples:


  • At the end of each day, make notes on your agenda/lesson plan about things that worked or didn’t work so the lesson can be modified
  • Look at assessment data and determine which student need additional practice or content review
  • The lesson cycle is a valuable framework that can be used by teachers to design, deliver and evaluate effective lessons. By following the four stages of the lesson cycle, teachers can ensure that their lessons are relevant, engaging, and meet the needs of their learners. The lesson cycle provides teachers with a structured approach to teaching, which can help to improve the quality of education provided to learners.

FREE Planning Guides for the following Subjects
  • World Geography
  • American History
  • World History
  • Civics, Government
  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth Science



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Early American History Textbook Replacement Readings

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities


Are you looking for ways to engage students in reading content? Are you looking for resources to practice using document based questions?

These American History DBQs and Close Reading Activities are in both Print & Google versions for Google Classroom. Each set includes original reading passages and charts to have students analyze key content. Also part of the Early American History Mega Bundle.


American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

Early American History Textbook Replacement Readings

INCLUDED:

  • Content Area Original Readings, Timelines, Graphic Organizers, & Poems
  • Reading Comprehension Questions
  • Writing Prompts
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Google Classroom Link
  • Answer Key

Historical Thinking Skills DBQ Close Readings in Google and Print

  • How to Read a Timeline
  • Primary & Secondary Sources
  • Historical Push and Pull Factors
  • Historical Thinking Skills
  • How to Analyze a Political Cartoon
  • How to Analyze a Primary Source

13 Colonies Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • 13 Colonies Teaching Suggestions
  • Diary from LaSalle’s Voyage Reading Activity
  • European Exploration of North America Reading Activity
  • Influential Figures of 13 Colonies Reading Activity
  • 13 Colonies Chart
  • All About the New England Colonies Reading Activity
  • All About the Middle Colonies Reading Activity
  • All About the Southern Colonies Reading Activity
  • 13 Colonies Timeline

Road to Revolution DBQ Close Reading Textbook Replacement Google Print

  • Road to Revolution Teaching Suggestions
  • Causes of the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Colonial Grievances Against England Reading Activity
  • Acts & Protests Against England Reading Activity
  • Boston Massacre Reading Activity
  • Boston Tea Party Reading Activity
  • The 1st Continental Congress Reading Activity
  • Timeline Leading Up to The American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Authors of the Declaration of Independence Reading Activity
  • Patriots vs. Loyalists Reading Activity
  • Key Locations leading up the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Key Historical Documents Leading Up to the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • French and Indian War Reading Activity
  • Treaty of Paris 1776 Reading Activity
  • Events Leading to Independence Reading Activity
  • Road to Revolution Reading Activity
  • Stamp Act Reading Activity
  • Sons of Liberty Reading Activity
  • Boston Patriots Reading Activity
  • Code Noir (1724) Reading Activity

American Revolution Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • The American Revolution Timeline Reading Activity
  • People of the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Lasting Affects of the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • ”Common Sense” by Thomas Paine Reading Activity
  • Battles of the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Continental Congress Summary Reading Activity
  • Loyalist vs. Patriots Reading Activity
  • American Revolution Statistics Reading Activity
  • Declaration of Independence Reading Activity
  • English Citizens Views on American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Role of Women in the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • Role of African Americans in the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • International Support for the American Revolution Reading Activity
  • The Treaty of Paris 1783 Reading Activity

Federalist Era Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions the Federalist Era
  • Overview of the Federalist Era Reading Activity
  • Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation Reading Activity
  • The Constitution and the Ratification Process Reading Activity
  • The Federalist Papers Reading Activity
  • Formation of Political Parties Reading Activity
  • Who are the Found Fathers?
  • Federalists vs. Anti-Federalist Reading Activity
  • Political Issues During the Federalist Era Reading Activity
  • The Presidency of George Washington Reading Activity
  • Washington’s Farewell Address Reading Activity
  • Alien and Sedition Acts Reading Activity
  • XYZ Affair Reading Activity
  • Legacy of the Federalist Era Reading Activity
  • Federalist Ear Timeline
  • People of the Federalist Era Chart
  • Key Locations of the Federalist Era
  • Key Historical Documents of the Federalist Era
  • Establishment of the Federal Bank Reading Activity
  • Federal Court System & the 1st Cabinet Reading Activity
  • Marbury v. Madison Judicial Review Reading Activity
  • War of 1812 Reading Activity
  • Legacy of Federalist Era Reading Activity

New Nation Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Limited vs. Representative Government Activity Reading
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • The American Revolution
  • Continental Congress
  • Articles of Confederation Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Why do we have a bi-cameral legislature?
  • Shay’s Rebellion
  • Constitutional Conventions
  • Founding Fathers
  • Virginia Plan vs. New Jersey Plan
  • The Great Compromise
  • The Bill of Rights & You
  • Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist
  • Federalist Papers
  • Compromises of the Constitution
  • Bonus: Extension Activity

Constitution Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Constitutional Poem
  • Roots of the Constitution
  • Principles of the Constitution
  • Federalism Activity Reading
  • Structure of the Constitution
  • Branches of Government
  • Checks and Balances
  • Preamble
  • Articles of the Constitution
  • Amending the Constitution
  • Citizen Rights in the Constitution
  • Bonus: Extension Activity

Western Expansion: Jefferson to Madison DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions for Western Expansion
  • Thomas Jefferson’s Presidency Reading Activity
  • The Louisiana Purchase Reading Activity
  • The Lewis and Clark Expedition Reading Activity
  • The War Of 1812 Reading Activity
  • The Treaty of Ghent Reading Activity
  • The Indian Removal Act Reading Activity
  • The Trail of Tears Reading Activity
  • Legacy of Westward Expansion Reading Activity
  • Thomas Jefferson Letter
  • Letter Opposing Louisiana Purchase
  • Madison Letter
  • Westward Expansion Timeline

Western Expansion: Monroe Era Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Western Expansion Teaching Suggestions
  • James Monroe Presidency Reading Activity
  • The Monroe Era Reading Activity
  • The Adams-Onis Treaty Reading Activity
  • The Missouri Compromise Reading Activity
  • The Treaty of 1818 Reading Activity
  • The Era of Good Feelings Reading Activity
  • The Erie Canal & Westward Expansion Reading Activity
  • Monroe Presidency Timeline
  • The Adams-Onis Treaty Reading Activity
  • The Monroe Doctrine Reading Activity
  • Gibbins vs. Ogden Reading Activity
  • Tariff of 1824 Reading Activity

Western Expansion: Adams to Taylor Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions Western Expansion
  • Timeline of Van Buren Presidency
  • The Panic of 1837 Reading Activity
  • The Trail of Tears Reading Activity
  • The Amistad Case Reading Activity
  • Tippecanoe & Tyler Too Reading Activity
  • Timeline of Tyler Presidency
  • The Webster-Ashburton Treaty Reading Activity
  • The Texas War for Independence & Annexation Reading Activity
  • The Lone Star Republic, Texas, Statehood Reading Activity
  • The Treaty of Wanghia Reading Activity
  • Timeline of Taylor Presidency
  • The Oregon Trail Reading Activity
  • The California Gold Rush Reading Activity
  • The Mexican-American War Reading Activity
  • The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Reading Activity

Industrial Revolution 1800s Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions Industrial Revolution & Expansion 1800s
  • Technologies and Economic Changes Reading Activity
  • Key Figures in American Industrialization Reading Activity
  • Transportation Revolution Reading Activity
  • Industrial Revolution Timeline
  • Inventions of the 1800s Reading Activity

Manifest Destiny Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Manifest Destiny Teaching Suggestions
  • Manifest Destiny Reading Activity
  • The Idea of American Exceptionalism Reading Activity
  • Oregon Territory Dispute Reading Activity
  • Legacy of Manifest Destiny Reading Activity
  • Timeline of Westward Expansion
  • The Louisiana Purchase Reading Activity
  • The Oregon Trail Reading Activity
  • Mexican-American War Reading Activity
  • Texas Annexation Reading Activity
  • California Gold Rush Reading Activity
  • Impact of Transcontinental Railroad Reading Activity
  • For & Against Manifest Destiny Reading Activity
  • Frederick Douglass, Voice of Dissent Reading Activity
  • Manifest Destiny Primary Sources Reading Activity
  • Impact of Manifest Destiny on Native Americans Reading Activity
  • Transportation & Manifest Destiny Reading Activity
  • Key Points in American Western Expansion on the Map
  • Key Historical Documents during Western Expansion Reading Activity

Reform Movements 1800s Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions
  • Reform Movements of the 1800s Reading Activity
  • Abolitionist Movement Reading Activity
  • Key Abolitionists Reading Activity
  • Frederick Douglass Reading Activity
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe Reading Activity
  • Women’s Rights 1800s Reading Activity
  • Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 Reading Activity
  • Declaration of Sentiments Reading Activity
  • Leaders of Women’s Rights Movement Reading Activity
  • Temperance Movement Reading Activity
  • Educational Reform Movement Reading Activity
  • Horace Mann & Public Schools Reading Activity
  • Prison & Asylum Reform 1800s Reading Activity
  • Dorothea Dix, Reformer Reading Activity
  • Labor and Workers’ Rights Movement 1800s Reading Activity

Sectionalism Pre Civil War Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions
  • Sectionalism Pre-Civil War Reading Activity
  • Economic Differences Between North & South Reading Activity
  • Slavery & Sectionalism Reading Activity
  • Tariffs and Economic Policies Pre- Civil War Reading Activity
  • State’s Rights vs. Federal Power Reading Activity
  • Cultural Differences Between North and South Reading Activity
  • Transcendentalist Movement Reading Activity
  • Crittenden Compromise Reading Activity
  • North vs. South Reading Activity
  • The Missouri Compromise Reading Activity
  • Nullification Crisis Reading Activity
  • The Compromise of 1850 Reading Activity
  • Bleeding Kansas & John Brown’s Raid Reading Activity
  • Key People Leading Up to Civil War Reading Activity
  • North, South, and West Reading Activity
  • Historical Documents Leading Up to the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Lincoln & Douglas Debates Reading Activity
  • The Election of 1860 Reading Activity

Civil War Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions The Civil War
  • Cause of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Civil War Timeline
  • Background & Causes of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Key Events and Battles of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • The Battle of Gettysburg Reading Activity
  • Antietam & Vicksburg Reading Activity
  • Life of a Civil War Soldier Reading Activity
  • Military Strategies & Technologies of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • African Americans in the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Home Front & Civilian Life During the Civil War Reading Activity
  • War Time Inventions Reading Activity
  • The Emancipation Proclamation Reading Activity
  • The Siege of Petersburg Reading Activity
  • The Surrender of Appomattox Reading Activity
  • People of Civil War Reading Activity
  • Effects of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • People of the Civil War Chart Reading Activity
  • Key Locations of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Key Historical Documents of the Civil War Reading Activity
  • Anaconda Plan Reading Activity

Reconstruction Textbook Replacement DBQ Close Readings in Google & Print

  • Teaching Suggestions
  • Goals and Challenges of Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln Reading Activity
  • Reconstruction Acts Reading Activity
  • President Andrew Johnson Reading Activity
  • Reconstruction Plans & Policies Reading Activity
  • The Freedman’s Bureau Reading Activity
  • African American Experience during Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • Challenges and Opposition to Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • Impact on Women & Native Americans during Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • Reconstruction in the West Reading Activity
  • Radical Republicans Reading Activity
  • African American Reconstruction Leaders Reading Activity
  • Resistance to Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • Legacy of Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • The Ongoing Struggle for Civil Rights Reading Activity
  • 14th & 15th Amendments Reading Activity
  • Plessy vs. Ferguson Reading Activity
  • Jim Crow Laws Reading Activity
  • Reconstruction Timelines Reading Activity
  • Key People During Reconstruction Reading Activity
  • Reconstruction Key Locations Reading Activity
  • Historical Documents from Reconstruction Reading Activity


American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

Early American History Textbook Replacement Readings


Perfect for:

  • Common Core support in any content area classroom.
  • Background Information: Clear, concise background information.
  • Test Prep: Reading and summaries to review key content.
  • AP TEST REVIEW: Document based questions/reading practice. DBQs
  • Lesson Planning: Use this packet to guide your lesson planning and ensure you include primary source reading and writing, which are common core skills.
  • Substitute Lessons (No Prep): Zero prep substitute lessons that guide students through key content and reading practice.
  • Bellwork or Ticket Out: Great to begin or end a lesson.
  • Homework: Great homework readings to trigger content knowledge and reading practice.

Aligned to Common Core Standards Comprehension Questions Aligned to Reading

  • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
  • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
  • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
  • Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).
  • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Why Use Close Readings with Secondary Students

  • Promotes Critical Thinking: Close readings require students to delve deeply into a text, analyze its content, and draw conclusions. This process fosters critical thinking skills, enabling students to question, evaluate, and interpret information effectively.
  • Enhances Textual Understanding: Close readings help students develop a deeper understanding of the text's nuances, themes, and authorial intent. This can be particularly valuable when studying history and government documents, as it allows for a more comprehensive grasp of historical events and political concepts.
  • Supports Language Skills: Analyzing complex texts improves students' vocabulary, reading comprehension, and writing abilities. These skills are essential for success in various academic subjects and in real-world scenarios.
  • Encourages Evidence-Based Discussions: Close readings prompt students to provide evidence from the text to support their interpretations and arguments. This practice enhances their ability to engage in meaningful discussions and debates, an essential skill in history and government classes.
  • Cultivates Attention to Detail: Through close readings, students learn to pay attention to details, such as word choice, tone, and literary devices. This skill can help them become more attentive and critical readers.
  • Fosters Independence: Close readings encourage students to work independently, developing the skills needed to analyze and comprehend texts on their own. This independence is crucial for lifelong learning.
  • Prepares for Standardized Tests: Many standardized tests, including those in history and government subjects, require close reading skills. Practicing close readings can help students excel in these assessments.
  • Connects to Real-World Applications: The ability to analyze and critically assess information is valuable beyond the classroom. It is a transferable skill that can be applied in various career paths, including curriculum development.

Early American History Textbook Replacement Readings

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep ActivitiesAmerican History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

American History DBQ Reading Activity, Google, History DBQ, Close Reading | American History Textbook Replacement | American History No Prep Activities

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